Hugo Richardson




_ABOUT

I am a thinker, spending much of my time researching, pondering and contemplating the world in which we find ourselves. I am also a maker, constantly fiddling, pulling apart and assembling things, with a love and interest in all materials. My roots in engineering and passion for design are constantly colliding, leading me to take an interdisciplinary approach to the complex and nuanced challenges we face.




_PROJECTS

The Tyre Collective

Canopy
Periplus Project
4 Usinisunde
Superform
A Study of Flight





_VIDEOGRAPHY

1 TTC - Project Video

2 TTC - Fast & Furious




_PRESS ︎︎︎

Get in touch ︎︎︎

Find my CV here ︎︎︎




︎︎



_A STUDY OF FLIGHT (201811) 


          The beauty and complexity of design in nature, achieved by small incremental improvements made over millennia, is far in advancement of our own technological achievements. A Study of Flight is an exploration through making to replicate the dynamism of a wing aloft and apply my engineering knowledge to a sculptural output. 

Fig .1    Hand driven kinetic prototype, a wing with two planes of rotation

Fig 2.    Cardboard mechanism iterations

        I have always found the intricate, predetermined movements of mechanisms to be deeply satisfying; a puzzle to translate one form of motion into another. As in nature, only by experimenting and iterating could I gain an understanding of the interaction between linkages and the degrees of freedom governing them.
        Through observations of the common London pigeon I built an understanding of the structure of the wing and their planes of rotation. My early prototypes were strips of cardboard connected by drawing pins and powered by hand. With successive iterations I refined the movement, gradually adding complexity and transitioning from cardboard to acrylic and aluminium. While computer modelling helped me to fine tune the dimensions, I opted to manufacture and build by hand at every stage.

Fig 3.    Sketches exploring form, assembly and mechanism variations


Fig 4.    All hand machined aluminium links and rivets, and their interaction with the motor are exposed to the scrutiny of the observer



Fig 5&6.    Using a rotary encoder hidden in the base, one can scroll through the bird’s range of movement or release it in continuous flight



Early sketches show my intention to cover the structure in material to suggest the form of a bird. The final sculpture is, however, stripped back. All hand machined aluminium links and rivets, and their interaction with the motor are exposed to the scrutiny of the observer. The sculpture is designed to be interacted with. Using a rotary encoder hidden in the base, one can scroll through the bird’s range of movement or release it in continuous flight once a velocity threshold is reached.